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UN World Youth Report 2005 launched, with CPRC contribution

4 Oct 2005

The UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) Programme on Youth launched its publication World Youth Report 2005 - Young people today, and in 2015 on 4 October 2005. An official report to the UN General Assembly on the 10th anniversary of its adoption of the World Programme for Action on Youth, the World Youth Report 2005 argues that with over 200 million youth living in poverty, 130 million youth illiterate, 88 million unemployed and 10 million living with HIV/AIDS, the case for a renewed commitment to the goals of the World Programme of Action is clear. It is further argued that too often, youth policy is driven by negative stereotypes of young people, including delinquency, drug abuse and violence, forgetting that young people are a positive force for development, peace, and democracy.

The Report contains three sections:

  • Part I: Youth in The Global Economy: Young people living in poverty
  • Part II: Youth and Civil Society: The emergence of a media-driven youth culture
  • Part III: Youth at Risk: Young people in armed conflict

For Part I, CPRC researcher Karen Moore contributed Chapter Three: Chronic, life-course and intergenerational poverty, drawn heavily from The Chronic Poverty Report 2004-05. A main argument of the chapter is that the extent to which a young person is economically dependent, independent, or depended upon within the household can change extremely rapidly, with significant implications for the present and long-term well-being of both young people and their families. Interventions in the areas of education, health and employment can break the poverty cycle; without such interventions, poverty tends to deepen with age and over successive generations.

Read the report...(opens link in new window)

  • Part I: Youth in The Global Economy: Young people living in poverty
  • Part II: Youth and Civil Society: The emergence of a media-driven youth culture
  • Part III: Youth at Risk: Young people in armed conflict

For Part I, CPRC researcher Karen Moore contributed Chapter Three: Chronic, life-course and intergenerational poverty, drawn heavily from The Chronic Poverty Report 2004-05. A main argument of the chapter is that the extent to which a young person is economically dependent, independent, or depended upon within the household can change extremely rapidly, with significant implications for the present and long-term well-being of both young people and their families. Interventions in the areas of education, health and employment can break the poverty cycle; without such interventions, poverty tends to deepen with age and over successive generations.

Read the report...(opens link in new window)

 

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